Archive for sweet corn

Week 12; August 23, 2012

What’s in the box?

Full Share

Sweet corn

potatoes

hot peppers mix (in the plastic bag)

red peppers

heirloom tomatoes

garlic

onions

slicer tomatoes

rainbow chard

carrots

parsley

Single Share

same as above, but in less quantity

Notes on the box….

This planting of Sweet Corn didn’t get much water, so it didn’t fill out as well as previous plantings and there’s less in the box than we had planned for.  This variety tastes more “corny” than sweet.  Hope you enjoy it!

Please store your potatoes, garlic, and onions in a cool dark place, but not the fridge.

See previous weeks for pepper and tomato storage tips.

Rainbow Chard and parsley will store best in a plastic bag in your fridge.  Soak in a sink of cold water  if they need perking up before you prepare them.  You can eat the colorful stems of the chard.  Slice them up and begin cooking them in at the same point you do onions in a recipe.  They take longer to cook than the leaves.  The leaves cook very quickly.  Use Chard as you would spinach in cooked recipes.

Recipes

Mexican Rice 

Homemade Refried Black Beans

Craig’s Fresh Roasted Chile Sauce 
Hot peppers (2 hot wax peppers, 2 or three jalapeno peppers, and a pablono if you have one) and  4 medium red bell or several sweet red roasting peppers.  Place whole peppers in a single layer in a baking pan and roast in the broiler until charred.  Remove from oven, flip, and roast until other side is charred.  Remove from broiler and let the peppers cool.  When you can handle them remove the seeds and stems (wear gloves for the hot peppers or rub your hands with oil before handling to avoid HOT HANDS).  While the peppers are cooling put 2 onions, peeled and coarsely chopped, along with 5 peeled garlic cloves in the broiler and allow to lightly char.
Add the above along with 2 cups chicken or vegetable stock,  1-2 tsp. salt, 1 or 2 large cored and seeded tomatoes and  put it all in the food processor and buzz it till smooth.
Heat 2 Tbsp oil in a saucepan and whisk in 1 Tbsp flour. Cook on high till flour browns a bit, but do not let it burn.
Slowly whisk in chile sauce, 1 Tbsp. cumin and 1 cup or less broth.  Reduce heat and simmer on low for 5- 10 minutes until the thickness you want.  It also thickens as it sits in the fridge.  This sauce is great on enchiladas, with the rice and beans above, on nachos…  I think it would be good on an old shoe.  It’s just so good.
Corn Farrotto Recipe from Bon appetite
Spicy Chard with Ginger

On the Farm…

The pizza party was a blast!  We think people were able to eat a good amount of pizza and had their smiles said they had a good time.  We really enjoyed getting to meet members that have been with us for several years that we hadn’t met.  We also loved talking to folks that had been out to the farm in the past.  We had a group of people that biked all the way to the farm from the twin cities!  We had a great turn-out.  The pizza oven stayed nice and hot and Derek and the crew did such great prep work that the pizzas just kept coming out and getting gobbled up in a nice steady stream.  The pizza buffet seemed to be a nice way to let people eat, explore the farm, and visit with each other.

We LOVED sharing our cheese with people and getting some great feedback!  That was very exciting and the cheese was well received.  Some really great comments that were very encouraging!

Thankfully the rain held out till most everyone had eaten some pizza and it stopped after about an hour and we were able to get the bonfire going.  We really appreciate everyone that came out to enjoy the pizzas with us!  We will let you know when the next pizza party will be!

an impossible load of branches for the bonfire

dough!

Lauren and the basil

Derek the amazing Pizza Chef!

Pizza party!

Craig and the oven and the storm clouds rolling in

Cheese tasting

the sand pile was a hit!

relaxing post-pizza

bonfire!

Next week….

tomatoes

green beans

peppers

corn?

onions

garlic

greens

winter squash?

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Week 12; September 8, 2011

Harvest Party will be on September 17th at the farm!  Potluck!  Beginning at 3 PM.  Email us to let us know if you will make it out.  Thanks!

What’s in the box?

full share:

sunshine (yellow) watermelon

green beans

sweet corn

cucumbers

green bell pepper

red bell pepper

hot pepper (the small lime green colored pepper)

broccoli

onions

slicer tomatoes

heirloom tomatoes

single share:

green beans

sweet corn

either sugarbaby watermelon (red), sunshine watermelon (yellow), or cantaloupe

onions

cucumbers

red bell peppers

green bell pepper

hot pepper (the small lime green pepper)

broccoli

slicer tomatoes

Notes on the box….

We are really happy to be putting the sunshine variety of melon in the box.  They were grown in the greenhouse and are SUPER sweet.  They have earned the nickname sugarbomb melon.  They are so addictively sweet that Otto has begun to refuse all food except for this melon.  Larry has been seen on multiple occasions hiding by the dumpster eating melon like a squirrel.  Josh spilled water all over the lunch table and Rama in his frenzy to crack open a melon.  A melon was sliced and Rama helped herself to half of the melon before it could be cut into smaller pieces.  We hope that you are enjoying it as much as we are.  We ran out of small sunshine melons that would fit into the single share boxes, so some of the single shares may have gotten the red melon or cantaloupe.  If your cantaloupe has green skin, let it sit on your counter for a while to ripen up some more.  OR, you can do what Joe from Sen Yai Sen Lek is doing with some of our unripe melons.  He is using them as a local replacement for papaya in his Som Tum (green papaya salad).  We made it here at home and it was great!  We used regular green beans and our own hot peppers.  Here’s a recipe from the NY times.

Green beans might get big enough for us to have them in the boxes again next week, but everything is slowing down its growth with the cooler temps that are setting in. We recorded a 39 degree night out here 2 nights ago. Just 2 more weeks until the official start of fall.

This is the last week of sweet corn.  Enjoy it!

If you are having trouble getting through your bell peppers, chop them up and put them in a freezer bag and freeze them.  Then you can add to soups and things later.  Never let a pepper go bad!

Broccoli, again, may have a looper or two.  The broccoli that I cooked last week had only a couple that fell out when I soaked it.  Again, just soak it in some cold salted water before chopping.  Swish it around in the water after it’s soaked. Any stragglers will let go.  The loopers are BAD this season.  The worst ever.  There are some organic approved sprays that we can use, but often times they kill the benificial insects as well which disrupts the balance on the farm. Because of this, we avoid using even the organic approved sprays.  We have found an organic approved spray that is specific to the loopers, so we will be using that on the rest of our crops that they are attacking.  However, we cannot ever guarantee that your produce will be 100% bug free.  If you are particularly bug-phobic, let us know and we can leave out broccoli from your box.

If you find yourself overrun with tomatoes that are getting too ripe before you can eat them, try this trick that one of our long time CSA members passed on…  Score the tomatoes with an x shape on the bottom.  Remove the core by cutting in a cone shape around it.  Put the whole tomatos in a freezer bag.  Put them in the freezer.  When you want to use them in a soup or stew or sauce later in the season, simply pull the bag out, let them defrost.  The skin will peel off easily when you run the tomato under some hot tap water.

For everything else, see the notes from last week, please.

Recipes…..

Corn Pudding

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

5 or 6 ears of corn, husked

1/4 cup granulated sugar (optional)

1/2 cup heavy cream or  whole milk

1/4 cup flour

1 teaspoon salt

5 large eggs

1 minced hot pepper (optional)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the butter in a baking dish ( or iron skillet works well) and slide into the oven so the butter melts while the oven is preheating.

Using a box grater, coarsely grate the kernels off four ears of corn. Use a sharp knife to cut the kernels from the remaining ears. Combine the corn kernels, sugar, cream or milk, flour and salt in a large mixing bowl. Lightly beat the five eggs and add to the mixture.

When the oven has preheated and the butter in the baking dish has melted, carefully tilt the melted butter from the baking dish into the corn mixture and combine with a few swift strokes. Then tilt the buttered corn mixture back into the baking dish.

Bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until a golden crust has formed and the interior has set.

 

A nice recipe that is for breakfast or dinner Grits with tomatoes and goat cheese!  Recipe calls for cherry tomatoes, but you can slice and roast any type of tomato.

 

Corn Relish can be made and kept in a jar in the fridge for a long time.  Really nice to have on hand to add color or use as an edible garnish.  If you want to use it all at once, make some quinoua (black or red makes it extra beautiful) and mix the relish in with the quinoua for a last minute side.   Adjust the amount of corn, peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers to your liking.  Cut kernals of 6 ears of corn off the cob. Finely chop a few green and red bell peppers, some onion, unpeeled but seeded cucumber, and some ripe tomatoes.  Mix it all up.  Bring 2 cups of vinegar, 1/2 – 1/4 cup of sugar, 2 tablespoons of salt, 1 tsp of tumeric, and 1 tsp mustard seed to a boil.  Pour over the veggies and let them sit at least overnight before serving.  If you like less crunch and more tender relish, you can simmer the veggies in the vinegar mixture for about 15 min.  Store in a jar in your fridge.

On the farm….

Otto and Calliope doing quality control on the sunshine melon

This dinner bell used to be on Josh's great grandpa's farm. Now it's on our farm!

next week….

pie pumpkins

carrots

tomatoes

peppers

cucumbers

potatoes

pesto basil bunches

broccoli

onions

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Week 9, Aug 18

If you ordered canning tomatoes, freezer corn, or cukes for pickling, please find the extra boxes or bags with your name on them at your drop site.  Thanks!  

Harvest Party will be on Sat. September 17th!  Potluck, hayrides, bonfire…FUN!

What’s in the box?full share:

sweet corn!

canteloupe melon

slicer and heirloom tomatoes

onions

garlic

green peppers

beets

cukes

zuke, patty pan, summer squash

cherry tomatoes

single share:

sweet corn!

cherry tomatoes

cukes

slicer tomatoes

peppers

onion

garlic

canteloupe melon

Notes on the box….

Sweet corn is bigger and better this week.  This is my favorite variety.  It’s nice and sweet,  but also good corn flavor and bicolor makes it pretty.  You have quite a bit in the box, so enjoy corn on the cob several while it’s here!  If you have corn left over from last week, try cutting it off the cob and adding it to corn pancakes or corn bread.  Or cut it from the cob, roast it in a skillet, tp with a little salt, chili powder, lime juice and mayo and add as a topping for tacos.

We are so excited to be putting canteloupe in the boxes!  This is a crop that we plant every year and this is the first time at this farm that we have had a crop to harvest!  And it’s a BUMPER.  If the boxes were bigger we could have put 2 melons in each box.  But as you will notice, space was tight in the boxes already.  These melons are picked ripe and should be enjoyed soon so that they don’t continue to ripen and loose their good texture.  If you do let them go, try making melon sorbet.  Yum!  Some people say they don’t like canteloupe.  Give this a try, it makes a big difference to have them picked ripe instead which the ones at the store rarely are.

We’ve gotten a few people say they have been having a hard time eating all the cucumbers.  I suggest slicing them up along with some tomatoes and putting them out while you are making dinner or bringing them to the table.  The are really good snacks.  There’s also cucumber water and fridge pickles and cucmber and yogurt sauce and cucumber onion salad and if you are exhauseted from dealing with cucmbers, cut them up and put them on your eyes cucumber spa style.  Does anyone have any other ideas?

If any of your tomatoes have splits (some get splits after we pick them as a result of too much rain) eat them ASAP.  They might start to attract fruit flies.  Always eat your ripest tomatoes first. We will continue to give you as many tomatoes as we can fit in the boxes until the first frost.  Most members can’t get enough.  If you are not a tomato person, now is a good time to make friends with neighbors by bringing them tomatoes.  See storage tips from last week.  Add fresh tomatoes, herbs (orageno or basil), and shredded parmesan to pasta at the end of cooking for some thing very quick and easy  (throw in some sauteed zukes and summer squash and garlic, too!).

Try slow roasting your cherry tomatoes.  Heat oven to 350 and cut tomatoes in half and put in a single layer on a baking sheet and bake for about an hour.  They become very sweet.  Good in pasta or on pizza.  Cherry tomatoes can also be halved any put in salads.

The tops of the beets don’t look so hot.  They’ve been beat up by the rain quite a lot.  We would have topped them, but decided to leave them on as a way to keep the cherry tomatoes from jumping out when we are moving the boxes around.  You might be able to salvage some for eating.  Otherwise, top the beets and store the roots in your crisper.  The beets are great roasted and then added to salads.  You can peel them, but you don’t have to.

Recipes

Anne’s Cucumber Slaw  

Dice cucumber, summer squash, green pepper (tomatoes, too, if you like them). Mix lemon juice and mayonnaise to make a nice sauce consistency. Toss with the vegies (Thanks Anne!)

Tea Scented Melon From Martha Stewart

Seed and slice melon, soak a few jasmine tea bags in 2 cups warm water, mix in 2 Tbsp. honey, put the melon in a baking dish and pour the tea and honey over the melons.  Put some fresh mint leaves in there.  Let soak for an hour, flip the melon slices over and soak for another hour.  Serve with the syrup.

Provencial Stuffed Tomatoes from John Besh

Heat oven to 350 degrees.  Cut 6 medium tomatoes in half cross wise and place in a baking dish with cut side up.  Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.  In a food processor combine 1/2 cup olive oil, 2 cups breadcrumbs, 3/4 cup parmesan, 4 garlic cloves, and a handfull of fresh basil.  Process till combined (wet and crumbly consistancy).  Top each tomato with some of the breadcrumb mixture and bake until tops are browned and tomatoes are warmed through, about 20 min.

On the farm….

We are looking forward to the farm dinner this weekend.  If you’d like to come, please RSVP.  It’s Saturday, come at 3, farm tour at 4, dinner at 5, byob.  Harvest for the Hungry fundraiser.  Pay what you can.  Grilled pork chops, coleslaw, tomato tarts, sweetcorn with homemade butter, and desert!

We had a really good melon harvest.  We love harvesting anything that involves throwing and catching.  Especially with melons that might fall, crack, and have to be eaten on the spot.  We ate 4 melons in less than an hour yesterday.  Quality control is a hard job.

just picked sweet corn for breakfast!

Corn smut, a fungus that grows on corn. It's edible, but we didn't put any in the CSA boxes, sorry!

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