Archive for June, 2012

Week 4; June 28, 2012

What’s in the box?

Full Share:

broccoli

green onions

head lettuce

garlic scapes

rainbow chard

mint

sugar snap peas

zucchini/ summer squash

Single Share:

broccoli

green onions

mint

turnips (or salad turnips)

lettuce

garlic scapes

sugar snap peas

zucchini/ summer squash

Notes on the box:

It’s HOT out there today. If your produce looks a little wilty when you get it from your dropsite, bring it home and fill your sink with cold water and let your veggies sit in there for abour 5 min.  They will perk back up.

There’s quite a bit of broccoli this week!  The stems can be eaten (some recommend peeling).  Just chop them up and cook the same as the rest of the broccoli.  Broccoli will store best in your crisper in a plastic bag.  If you’d like to freeze it, simply chop it up, blanche it, dunk it into cold water, allow it to drain, and then put it in a freezer bag in your freezer.  Our favorite way to eat broccoli these days is roasted.  Wash and chop it, toss with a little olive oil, spread it on a baking pan, and roast at 425 for 20 min or until you start to get some crispy bits on the edges.  If roasting sounds too hot to do this weekend, broccoli slaw is great!  Recipe below…

Rainbow Chard may be new to some of you.  It’s leaves can be used the same as spinach in cooked recipes.  AND the beautiful stalks are edible as well.  Chop them and saute them a few minutes before you cook the leaves since they take a little longer to cook.  You can put them in with the garlic or onions in a recipe.  We’ve never tried chard raw.  Have any of you?

Only single shares got turnips this week.  They are either the salad turnips that we gave last week, or they are regular turnips picked baby size.  Store the tops separate from the root part to keep the roots crisp longer.  They are both edible and the tops have a slightly spicy mustard-y flavor.  See last weeks post for suggestions.

This is the beginning of the zucchini and summer squash.  There will be more in the weeks to come.  Classic Summer veggies that remind us that Summertime is here!

Mint is a new addition to the box for us!  We put mint in some of the herb pots, but figured that everyone would like to get some.  It’s a nice versatile herb.  You can have fresh mint tea with honey, mint water is nice and refreshing on a hot day, it’s great in cocktails (mojitos?!) or in salad.   Try pairing the mint with the sugar snap peas!  YUM!

The Sugar Snap Peas should be rinsed before eating.   These are not shell peas that you would have to take out of the pod.  The shell of the sugar snap pea is edible and so delicious!  This variety is supposed to be “stringless”, but they can be “stringed”.  To string them, pull the longer end with the blossom toward the opposite end.  A little string will come off.  If you don’t want to do this, don’t worry about the string.  It’s not so stringy that it can’t be chewed.  You can chop the peas if you don’t want to leave them whole.

how to string a sugar snap pea

Recipes:

Turnip Rock Asian Kale Wraps     (Many many thanks to Kelly Lynn, Arthur, and Maxwell for this recipe!!)

For filling:

1 pound ground turkey (or beef or pork)
1 tbsp cooking oil
1 large onion chopped
2 green garlics chopped (or 2 garlic cloves)
3-4 garlic scapes chopped (or green onions)
2 carrots shredded
2-3 salad turnips finely chopped (or 8 oz can of water chestnuts)
1/4 cup soy sauce
3 tbsp spicy black bean sauce, teriyaki sauce or hoison sauce
A few shakes of red pepper flakes and black pepper
2 tsps seasame oil
1/4 cup fresh cilantro

2 cups cooked rice

12 kale and spinach leaves (or large lettuce leaves)

1/2 package crushed raman noodles

1.  Heat oil in a wok or skillet.  Brown the ground turkey with onions and garlic for about 5-7 minutes until lightly brown.  Add the carrot, soy sauce and salad turnips.  After heated through, add the teriyaki sauce, red pepper, black pepper and finally the sesame oil and fresh cilantro.

2.  Arrange leaves around the outer edge of a serving platter.  To serve, allow each person to spoon a small amount of rice into each leave top with stir fry mixture and drizzle with additional soy sauce.  We love to sprinkle crushed raman noodles on top for an extra crunch.  Wrap the leaf to enclose filling.  Enjoy this fresh meal of the summer.

Maxwell suggests that you can use Collard Greens for the wrap!

Spring Salmon with Green Garlic Peas and Radish (from Abby and Matthew who are members and have a fantastic food blog.  Congrats on the future veggie lover, you guys!)

Sugar Snap Peas With Mint

Rinse peas and take off blossom end.  Rinse a few sprigs of mint, discard stem, and chop up leaves.  Heat some butter in a skillet.  When butter is melted add peas and saute over medium heat till bright green (about 4 min).  Add mint and saute a minute more.  Sprinkle with corse salt.  You can also add orange or lemon zest at the end for something different.

Broccoli Slaw

Wash a couple heads of broccoli and either finely chop (stems and all) by hand or run them through your food processor with the cutting blade attachment.  Place them in a bowl.  Add several finely chopped radishes and/or turnips, a few chopped green onions, and a couple of chopped garlic scapes.  Mix about 1/3 cup mayo with a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, 3 Tbsp. (or less) sugar, some salt and pepper.  Pour dressing over veggies, mix well, and allow to sit for at least 10 min before serving.  You can also add slivered almonds, toasted sunflower seeds, and raisins or dried cranberries if you like.

Rainbow Chard Recipes:

Orecchiette and Sauteed Vegetable Salad  (this one calls for fennel and fresh corn, which aren’t in the box, but you could sugar snap peas instead)

Zucchini and Chard Gratin

And for your Chard stems…  Sriracha PICKLES!  YES!  (you could add garlic scapes, too!  They are great pickled)

On the farm….

getting the first summer squash of the season with hay drying and perfect sky.

next weeks peas hangin out and waiting

pea pickin

more pea pickin. It takes a lot of pickin to get those little peas to add up!

That’s one beautiful field of brassicas!

Cassandra emptying her harvest bag full of broccoli. One of many many many full harvest bags of broccoli this week!

Coming soon…

purple cabbage

another variety

that’s a baby cucumber with its flower still attached!

a couple of our lunches….

pulled pork sandwich, chips, sugar snap peas with mint, and broccoli slaw

garlic scape lemon rice, sauteed kale, salad, and lemon roasted chicken

And the big news for the week….

Lemon Roasted Chicken and someone who is excited to try it.

We will be doing a meat delivery on Friday July 6.  If you order meat from our web store, we deliver the meat frozen to your home (or place of business).  But the big news is that WE HAVE CHICKEN!  And this chicken is seriously tasty.  Like the best chicken we’ve ever eaten tasty.  Like we ate chicken 4 meals in a row tasty.  Like every time we ate one of those meals the entire conversation revolved around how tasty the chicken is tasty.  Please check out our web store for more information.  Click on the details button for the complete rundown.  It’s fantastic grilled.  If you can’t get in on this delivery, you can order later for our next delivery of meat sometime in August.

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Week 3; June 21, 2012

What’s in the box?

Full Share:

romaine lettuce

loose leaf spinach

lacinato kale

broccoli

garlic scapes

salad turnips

radishes

strawberries

 

Single Share:

romaine lettuce

broccoli

lacinato kale

loose leaf spinach

garlic scapes

radishes

Some notes on the box…

We got hit with a lot of rain.  Not as much as some other farms, but enough that it’s made harvest time pretty muddy.  So expect to see some dirt on your head lettuce and expect that you should give everything (even the strawberries!) a good rinse before eating it.  The big raindrops make soil splash up onto the plants, and although we wash them, there’s still some dirt on there.

We thought we would have snap peas this week, but they weren’t quite ready yet.  Next week for sure!

The romaine lettuce is one that we really like.  It is nice and crunchy.  Store it in an open plastic bag in the crisper of your fridge.

The broccoli is coming quick with this sudden hot weather.  It looks and tastes great!  We have a whole lot of it in the field.

The spinach is so tender and when it rained hard two nights in a row, it got kind of beat up.  We were planning on bunching it, but it was just too muddy so we cut it loose leaf and bagged it.  It’s not the prettiest spinach, but it’s still tasty.  Tender enough for salads, but good cooked as well.

The garlic scapes will look familiar to you if you are a returning member.  In our survey from last season we had several people say that they hadn’t tried scapes before and that they really liked them.  We hope that those folks enjoy these and we hope that our new members try them and enjoy them as well!  They are fantastic coated with a little olive oil and put whole on the grill!  Sprinkle with a little salt and maybe pepper.  Such a treat!  The scapes are the immature flower and stem from the bulb of garlic.  We take them off to help the bulb grow bigger, and also because they are such a seasonal treat.  You can use them as you would a green onion, but it will have a garlicy flavor, or you can use them as you would garlic cloves, but they will give a milder garlic flavor.  They can be stored in your crisper for a few weeks.

Salad turnips or Hakurei turnips are ones that we haven’t grown much before.  We had a limited number of seed, so we only had enough bunches for the full shares.  We will see if some of the smaller ones in the field size up for single shares next week.  Store them like radishes.  The tops make a fine stand in for arugula and the lovely white roots are so sweet.  We have not tried them cooked because they barely make it into the house to get onto the plates.  They are fantastic for plain unadorned munching.  It’s the only was I can reccomend eating them as it’s the only way we’ve tried them so far.  Otto is crazy about these guys, so we know these are kid friendly.

It was a great week and then it was the worst week in the Strawberry patch.  On Sunday all was looking very promising with berries sizing up nicely and much fewer catface berries than the last couple of weeks.  Then we got a heavy beating rain followed by bright sunshine and some serious heat which literally cooked the wet berries.  The slugs are also really bad in this wet weather and they do some significant damage on the berries. We had a heartbreaking time picking and having to throw out berries that were perfect and beautiful on one side and total mush on the other.  Lots of searching with not many passable berries to be found.  We only had enough for full shares, but maybe if the weather turns around we might be able to get them for half shares next week.  Note that some of the berries came from next season’s patch and need a rinse to clean off the dirt.

Recipes….

Super Rad Radish and Broccoli Stir fry

We made this stir fry at the farm 3 times in 4 days because it’s so easy but so tasty.  With these veggies it’s usually best to just let the flavor of the vegetables shine.  They don’t need much dressing up.   Chop up garlic scapes, broccoli stalk (keep florets separate), and radishes.  Set aside.  In a bowl, scramble some eggs with a little salt.  Put some vegetable oil in your wok and heat it up.  Put the eggs in and stir until they are cooked scrambled egg style.  Remove them from the wok.  Add a little more oil if you need to and then put in the garlic, broccoli stems, and radish.  Stir fry for a few minutes.  Add broccoli florets and some soy sauce (not too much, just a couple of splashes)  and stir it around until broccoli is tender but still crisp.  Turn off the heat, mix in the eggs.  That’s it!  Serve with udon or soba noodles, or rice.

Broccoli Parmesan Fritters from Smitten Kitchen

Here’s a list of several suggestions and recipes for Garlic Scapes from Serious Eats

Kale Chips are everywhere now!  In bags at the grocery store?!  But they are SO EASY to make at home!  Our wonderful Robbinsdale host, Paula,  introduced us to this several years ago and it would be wrong of me not to suggest it.  The recipe in this link has pictures.  This is a great way to help warm up those kale skeptics.  P.S. You can make these chips and then crush them up and sprinkle them on popcorn!  What?!  YES!

On the farm…..

Let me get this farmer weather complaint out of my system…..  That’s enough rain, thanks!!!  Can someone make it stop please?!

Folks, the bugs are EVERYWHERE this season.  With the mild Winter, early Spring, and warm weather there have been an abundance of bugs.    We’ve seen so many insects that we have never even seen before.  At least a dozen that are brand new to us.  And the slugs are all over everything with the high moisture we’ve had lately.  We have some Organic approved sprays, but have so far decided not to use them because although there are pests, there are also a lot of beneficial insects out there that the sprays would kill.  We are watching the battles closely between the good guys and bad guys and if it looks like the bad guys are winning to the detriment of our crops, we will spray.  What this means for you is that you may find the occasional slug, caterpillar, worm, or bug on your produce.  The bugs on the produce are herbivores that want to eat your veggies, not bite you.  We want to encourage a balance of good to bad insects on our farm and avoid using even the Organic approved sprays as much as possible.  Wash your veggies and keep an eye out as you prepare them and all should be well.  With all the farm food that we cook and eat I’ve only had a lady bug in a salad make it to the plate.

Hey, who are you??

Standing water. Too wet to cultivate so now we have some serious weeds creeping in.

funny farm

fancy sky

Next week?

broccoli

lettuce

sugar snap peas

garlic scapes

summer squash

swiss chard or another green

turnips?

strawberries for some?

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Week 2 deliveries behind schedule!!

Hi folks.  We are having some vehicle issues and most of our deliveries (with the exception of River Market, Mississippi Market, and QBP) will be about  two hours behind schedule.  Please keep an eye on your email to see when we deliver to your dropsite.  Sorry for the inconvenience.

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Week 2; June 14, 2012

What’s in the box?

Full Share:

strawberries x 2

green garlic

head lettuce (green leaf and red oak leaf)

radishes

herb pot x 2

spinach

collard greens

Single Share:

strawberries

green garlic

basil pot

head lettuce

collard greens

radishes

spinach

Notes on the box….

Please see Week 1 blog entry for storage tips for everything in the box.

The head lettuce is quite a bit smaller than we usually send it out,  but it’s tasty!  We gave it the usual dunk in water, but you should wash it again.  We had some rain recently and it was VERY dirty when we pulled it out of the field.  If you are going to use a few leaves for sandwiches or garnish, peel those off and rinse them under running water.  If you are going to make a salad and want to use the whole head, I recommend filling your sink with cold water, cutting off the stump,  putting the loose leaves in the water, and swishing  it around in the water.  Let it sit for a while so the dirt sinks to the bottom of the sink.  Remove the lettuce from the water and place in a colander to drain. Inspect the leaves to be sure thy are clean.  If not, refill the sink and wash again.  The dirt likes to hide in the crannies of the leaves, and nothing ruins a good salad like crunching on some dirt. So be sure to take a few minutes to make sure your lettuce is clean!

The Collard Greens are fantastic at this time of year!  They, like the kale, are very tender and have a more mild flavor than they would later in the season.  The best way to cook them is to keep it simple.  Remove the stem, stack the leaves together, roll them up like a cigar and slice them about a 1/4 to 1/2 inch thin.  Cut your green garlic up and start it sautéing in some oil, butter, or bacon grease.  Put the collards in after a couple of minutes.  Saute the greens until they are very bright green (just a few minutes).  Taste them.  You can cook them longer if you prefer.  Season to taste.  Serve as a side.

The basil pots will do best if you plant them into a bigger pot or in your flowerbed or garden.  We will put basil leaves in the boxes later in the season, but it’s nice to have a plant on hand for a few leaves as you need them.

If you find anything off or missing in your box, please let us know!

Recipes….

Strawberry Cake

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup sugar plus some more for sprinkling the top of the cake
1 large egg
1/2 cup milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
pinch of cardamom
1 pint strawberries,  tops removed and halved

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 10-inch pie plate or cake pan. Whisk flour, baking powder, cardamom, and salt together into a medium bowl.  Whip butter and sugar with an electric mixer on medium-high speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Reduce speed to medium-low; mix in egg, milk, and vanilla or almond extract.  Reduce speed to low; gradually mix in flour mixture. Transfer batter to buttered pie plate. Arrange strawberries on top of batter, cut sides down and close together. Sprinkle sugar over berries. Bake cake 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees. Bake until cake is golden brown and firm to the touch, about 1 hour. Let cool in pie plate on a wire rack.

Here’s a few links to some good recipes:

Spinach Strawberry Salad from the kitchn

Strawberry Basil Mojito is one of our favorites on a hot evening.

 We had these Braised Radishes with our lunch today.  They were a hit!

 On the farm…

      Well, week one deliveries went pretty well!  We had a few hiccups, but hopefully nothing too major.  We’ve gotten some good feedback from the Week 1 boxes which we appreciate. If you have any questions or concerns about your CSA box or if there are any problems please let us know!  We will do our best to avoid problems, but we want to solve any that may come up.

     The weather has been quite lovely for being a farmer, though we did get a sprinkling of rain on the hay that Josh laid down to be baled tomorrow.  That was a bummer.  But the veggies like the rain!

Craig bunching radishes and Otto checking out the bunches.

Beautiful bunches!

Washing lettuce.

Packing boxes

Otto’s portion of the berry harvest.

What’s up for next week?

sugar snap peas!

broccoli

garlic scapes

strawberries?

head lettuce

rainbow chard or lacinato kale

spinach?

salad turnips

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Week 1; June 7, 2012

What’s in the box?

full share

strawberries

eggs

curly kale

spinach x2

radishes

green garlic

herb pot with sage, thyme, and oregano

single share

spinach

curly kale

herb pot with thyme and mint

eggs

strawberries

green garlic

radishes

Notes on the box….

Spinach is a nice variety that stays very tender and quite sweet even at full size.  When you get it home, place it in a plastic bag and store it in your crisper until you are ready to use it.  When you are ready to use it, fill your sink with cold water, remove the rubber band from the bunch, and swish it around a little in the water.  Let it soak and allow any dirt or sand to sink to the bottom of your sink.  Remove from the cold water, remove the stems by cutting the bunch about even with the bottom of the leaves.  The stems are still quite tender and not stringy, so you don’t need to worry much about getting rid of all of the stems.  Put the leaves in a collendar and allow them to drain.  You can either cook your spinach or chop it and use it as you would salad greens.

Curly Kale is here again!  If you are a new member and you haven’t even encountered kale, here’s your chance to try it!  Kale should be stored in the fridge in your crisper stored in an open plastic bag.  It will last for at least a week and likely closer to two.  If it seems a little limp, you can soak it in cold water and it will perk back up.  Remove the stem before cooking.  Kale is often quite toothsome, but this young kale is super tender and if you want to try it raw, I’ve included a recipe for a raw kale salad.  If that is too much too soon, kale is great simply sautéed in butter or oil with some chopped green garlic until it is bright green.  If you want to consume your kale, but you don’t like it’s flavor you can add a few leaves to a smoothie.  It’s VERY good for you and is among one of the most nutrient dense foods, so eat it up and know that you are treating your body to something healthy!

Radishes store best with the tops removed.  Take the tops off and put them in a baggie in your crisper.  The tops are edible as well.  If you use your spinach fresh like a salad green, you can wash your radish tops and treat them the same way.  You can add them to a spinach salad to add a little bit of spice.  The radishes themselves are very yummy this time of year.  We grow French Breakfast (the long pink with white tips) and a red globe radish.  They are a great spicy snack.

Green Garlic is simply garlic that has not yet matured.  You can use it as you would a green onion or you can cook with it as you would garlic.  It has a more mild flavor than bulb garlic, so it’s great to eat fresh.  You can put it straight into your crisper.  When you are ready to use it, cut off the rooty part at the end and slice all the way up to where the leaves start to separate.  You can cut up into the leafy part, but watch out for dirt that likes to hide between the leaves and the stalk.  Green garlic is a seasonal treat.  We hope you enjoy it!

Strawberries have not been sprayed with pesticides, so you can feel fine about eating them right away without even washing them.  If they make it all the way to your home, store them in the fridge and congratulations on your self-control!  They are best fresh and we pick them ripe, so they won’t last for more than a couple of days in your fridge.

Eggs are from our lovely layers.  They range in the pasture with our cows and eat an Organic grain ration along with whatever looks yummy out in the field.  The small eggs are from the younger hens and will be a one time treat for folks who don’t have an egg share.  Our only recommendation with the eggs is to not try to use them for egg salad or hard-boiled because they are too fresh for that and won’t peel easily.

Herbs can be kept in a sunny spot and watered regularly or they can be replanted into a garden or flowerbed or window box if you want to let them get bigger. Take off a few leaves at a time to use in you cooking.

Clockwise from noon: Sage, oregano, Thyme

Recipes….

Spinach, Green Garlic, and Ricotta Fritatta  

Raw Kale Salad – 

1 bunch of young kale, washed, dried, de-ribbed and chopped into bite size pieces

2 tablespoons pine nuts, walnuts, pecans or sunflower seeds, toasted

Parmesan shavings, to taste

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon honey

Salt, to taste

Clean and chop kale and put in salad bowl. Toss with nuts and Parmesan.

Whisk together oil, lemon juice, honey and salt, and toss with salad. Let sit for about 20 minutes before serving.

Green Garlic Pesto-

3-5 stalks green garlic chopped into rounds (about 1 cup)
¼ cup olive oil
½ cup chopped toasted walnuts, pinenuts, or sunflower seeds
½ cup fresh parmesan cheese, finely grated juice of 1 lemon
2 Tbsp. fresh herbs  (parsley, basil, mint, dill, cilantro, Oregano, Sage, or a combination), finely chopped
1 Tbsp. capers, sautéed anchovies, or chopped olives (if desired)
Salt, black pepper, lemon juice, and  red pepper flakes to taste

Saute the chopped garlic in 2 Tbsp. olive oil over medium heat until softened, about 3 minutes.

In a food processor, pulse sautéed garlic and the rest of the ingredients until well combined but not entirely smooth. Adjust seasoning as desired AFTER adding whatever salty ingredients you’d like.  Salt adds depth, lemon adds acidity,  walnuts and cheese thicken and add creaminess, and olive oil can balance overly sharp flavors. The pesto is best fresh but will keep in the fridge for a week or so.  Mix with cooked pasta or use as a spread on a sandwich.

Best Radish Snack Ever

Wash radishes, slice thin and put slices on top of buttered bread (baguette or crusty wheat works well) sprinkle with a little salt.  Yum!  Springtime!

On the farm…..

Getting Green Garlic

Radish heap

Strawberries and Spinach before harvest

Peas Climbing and Peas Flowering

Tomatoes Flowering and Tomatoes Tomato-ing!

Notes from the field….

The weather out here has been dry for a change. we’ve been running irrigation and staying on top of weeds. We have very heavy soil so it holds water well. BUT when it is wet you can almost make pots out of it. We also have plenty of irrigation capacity so we can fair a drought very well.

Every season holds its own unique challenges. This season was the warm weather speeding up garlic and berries while everything else we planted was about a week behind, even though it looked like we would even out. This is why you didn’t see any head lettuce in the box, and why the radishes may seem small. Things will catch up, but we couldn’t pass on the berries and spinach that were ready to go now. The current broccoli and cabbage crops are looking great, no bugs (so far), perfect temps, large healthy plants… We are excited to get into that.

The strawberries… well, out in the field many of them are small and cat-faced (puckered on the end with a seed ball). We have to do some research to find out why this is.  We aren’t sure how many more we will be getting out there. We retired a three year old patch and have planted a patch that is almost twice as large for next year. I know most everyone LOVES berries and would probably be thrilled with just a big box of berries, but they are extremely time consuming to harvest and keep up, plus very temperamental from year to year. This is why we diversify and we hope that next season the yields will be better.

What’s in the box next week?

green garlic

herb pot part 2

head lettuce

radishes

greens

strawberries? (keep your fingers crossed)

sugar snap peas?

broccoli?

Remember to leave your box behind at the drop site if you can. If not, try to remember to bring them back with you sometime, we will reuse them. Don’t rip them or we will have to throw them out. If you are not sure how to unfold your box, check out the step by step we made on doing so (scroll back to the last post) or ask someone at your drop.

Farm events..

We will be having a pizza eating contest here on the farm this summer. Maybe in July. It’s actually not a contest, but  we are building a wood fired earth oven and thought we would make some pizzas featuring some of our very own farmstead cheese.  Stay tuned as we fine tune the date on that…

Happy eating!

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FIRST DELIVERY THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 7!

We are excited to announce that we will be delivering the first CSA box of the season this Thursday, June 7.  It’s a week earlier than we had planned, but the berries are coming in and we have some beautiful spinach that wants to get to your kitchen!

Please mark your calendar and make sure that you have been getting emails from us.  We have sent one with information about delivery times and directions at your chosen drop site.  If you haven’t gotten any emails, make sure we are on your safe list.

What can you expect in the first box?

strawberries (we will likely give berries to either single OR full shares depending on how many are ready.  If you don’t get them this week, you will get them next week.  If there’s enough, everyone will get them!)

herb pot

green garlic

spinach

greens

eggs!  (we will be putting pullet eggs in all the boxes this week.  If you would prefer that we not put eggs in your box, please let us know and we will leave them out)

So please read your email and check out your member account and the “pick-up directions” tab for all the details of your drop site.  Also, if you are a first time member or a returning member who needs a refresher, watch this short video about how to unfold your CSA box without ripping it so that we can re-use it!

Here’s the video made by Springdale Farm in Plymouth, WI.

Or if you’d rather just look at some pictures, here’s a few to help you out

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