Archive for October, 2010

Winter week #2

What’s in the box?

radishes

beets

carrots

delicata winter squash (oblong yellow ones)

garlic

potatoes

acorn winter squash (dark green with deep ribs)

spinach

rainbow chard

broccoli side shoots

onions

parsley

a few notes on the box…

Radishes will keep longer if you remove the tops and store the roots in a plastic bag in the crisper.  Chard and parsley can also go into an open plastic bag in the crisper.  Chard can be cooked as you would spinach.  Just chop the stalks first and sautee them ahead of time then add the leafy part as they cook quickly.  Winter Squash, onions, potatoes, and garlic should be stored out of the fridge.  Winter squash will keep quite well on your counter and is nice and festive.  It can be cut in half, seeds removed, oil a pan and place cut side down.  Roast in the oven at 35o to 400 until a fork easily pokes into the squash.  Enjoy with butter and chopped parsley or butter and brown sugar.

Recipes….

recipes to come this evening.  please check back!  If you need an idea right away, lots of things in the box can be roasted (winter squash, root veggies, even broccoli) so get the oven cranked up and enjoy some hot food and a cozy kitchen!

on the farm…

60 miles per hour wind blew over our chicken coop!  whoops!  Don’t worry, the chickens were all okay and the coop should be righted and will be fine as well.

Hope you are well and not blowing away!

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Winter Week #1

What’s in the box?

broccoli

turnips

potatoes

carrots

leeks

salad mix

winter squash

radishes

garlic

parsley

A few notes on the box…..

This box is the first of the winter shares and the last box for our half share members at the following drop sites:

Cake Eater, Hiawatha, Butter Cafe, SunnySide Gardens, Eden Prairie.

Welcome to winter shares!  If this is your first encounter with turnips… Turnips and radishes store for a long time if you remove the tops and keep them in a plastic bag.  Cube up the turnips and potatoes and cook them along with a roast.  They can also be mashed with potatoes or alone or made into a gratain.  I’m posting the recipe from last weeks blog with Jenna’s Turnip Recipe because it’s really so good.  You can also slice the turnips and fry them until tender in butter.  The greens can be braised and eaten as well.

We  soaked the broccoli in cold water for a long time to get the little looper worms to let go.  If you still happen to have any on your broccoli, our apolologies.  They won’t hurt you, but they might gross you out.  Try Soaking them again in a sink of cold water and aggitating them to shake them loose. The way we look at it is this, you either get a few worms or a dose of chemicals. Who needs an Organic certification agency when you have worms hu? Store the broccoli in a plastic bag in the fridge.  When you are ready to eat it, be sure to cut up the stalks and include that part as well.

Parsley is good for more than just a garnish!  It  tastes really nice with potatoes and butter.  It can be chopped and added to salad mix for a nice brightness.  It’s super high in Vitamin C!  It goes great with fish!    If you chop it finely and sprinkle it over scrambled eggs, you have a super fancy looking breakfast.  There ya go.

The winter squash is a variety called Carnival.  Use it as you would an Acorn Squash.

Recipes…..

Jenna’s Amazing Turnip Rock Last box lunch

Wash then cube your turnips.  Place in a pot with a little bit of water and leeks, and bring to a simmer.  You have two options for adding the squash.  you can peel it then cut it in half and remove the seeds, then cube it and add it to the turnips.  Otherwise, roast your squash then scrape it out and add it to the already tender turnips. Its a sweet and tender mash of squash and

turnips.

from the stone soup…..

[5 ingredients | 10 minutes]
couscous & broccolini salad

serves 2

The almonds add a bit of nutty crunch but you could easily go without. It’s delicious warm, but also wonderful chilled, so feel free to make extra for work lunches.

 

This is wonderful as a simple main course for lunch or dinner. I’ve also used it as a base for a side salad, replacing the almonds with a bunch of coarsley chopped flat leaf parsley – kinda like a broccoli tabbouleh – just the thing to serve with babaganoush.

1 bunchbroccoli, chopped
1/2 cup couscous or quinoua
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
small handful flaked almonds

1. Bring a cup of water to boil in a medium saucepan.

2. Add broccoli and cook for 4 minutes.

3. Remove from the heat. Add couscous, soy, vinegar and 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil. Stir to combine and season.

4. Stand, covered for another 4 minutes.

5. Fluff couscous with a fork. Taste and season.

On the farm…

A few more piglets were born this week and 100 baby chicks were deliverd by mail.  They should be laying by next Spring and we will be pleased to offer an egg share… Yay!

It’s getting colder and today we said goodbye to Jenna….  She’s off to San Francisco for a new adventure.  Thanks SO MUCH, Jenna for all of your hard work and your spirit!  We will miss you!

Jenna harvesting onions in the summertime.

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Welcome to the world Otto James Bryceson… official Turnip Rock future bean picker

An update from last weeks blog….  

Otto James was born on October 15th at 6:39 AM.  A very healthy 8 lbs 11 oz!

Thanks to everyone for the words of encouragement and the well wishes! We are blessed!

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Week 19. October 14, 2010. Last box, B week half shares have one more delivery

What’s in the box?

broccoli

salad mix with spinach

Carnival Winter Squash (the spotted one)  and/or Thelma Sanders Winter Squash (the tan one)

parsley

potatoes

turnips with tops

leeks

garlic

a final cabbage….

 

A few notes on the box…

Amazing what some dry weather and sunny days will do in the fall.

This carnival winter squash and Thelma Sanders can be enjoyed the same as you would the Acorn type. Carnival is just more festive! and Thelma Sanders is an heirloom.

We put the spinach in with the salad mix because it didn’t size up fast enough to amount ot much on it’s own.  Makes for an extra tasty salad, though.  To be sure your salad mix is grit free: 1)fill your sink with cold water. 2)put the salad mix in the water.  3)slosh it around gently and allow it to sit for a few minutes to let the dirt settle to the bottom of the sink.  4) place sald into colander to drain shaking it gently or give it a whirl in your salad spinner.  5)enjoy!

Turnips and radishes store for a long time if you remove the tops and keep them in a plastic bag.  Cube up the turnips and potatoes and cook them along with a roast.  They can also be mashed with potatoes or alone or made into a gratain. OR try the amazing recipe below that Jenna made for our lunch…

The final cabbage.  sigh.  I know a lot of folks have been overwhelmed with this veggie, but our brussel sprouts didn’t make it this season…  The good thing about this variety in particular is that it is a storage cabbage.  That means it will hold in your fridge for a long long long time.  Perhaps until you are craving some brats stewed in thinly sliced and steamed cabbage with onions? And don’t forget, cabbage it a miracle, it has been known to dissolve tumors.

We  soaked the broccoli in cold water for a long time to get the little looper worms to let go.  If you still happen to have any on your broccoli, our apolologies.  They won’t hurt you, but they might gross you out.  Try Soaking them again in a sink of cold water and aggitating them to shake them loose. The way we look at it is this, you either get a few worms or a dose of chemicals. Who needs an Organic certification agency when you have worms hu? Store the broccoli in a plastic bag in the fridge.  When you are ready to eat it, be sure to cut up the stalks and include that part as well.  It will stretch your broccoli and it tastes great!  If you have too much broccoli to get through… chop, steam gently, allow to cool, then freeze it in a freezer bag.

Recipes

Jenna’s Amazing Turnip Rock Last box lunch

Wash then cube your turnips.  Place in a pot with a little bit of water and leeks, and bring to a simmer.  You have two options for adding the squash.  you can peel it then cut it in half and remove the seeds, then cube it and add it to the turnips.  Otherwise, roast your squash then scrape it out and add it to the already tender turnips. Its a sweet and tender mash of squash and turnips.

Farmers musing on the season……

So since it is the final box and we have heard a lot of your opinons of how the season went. We thought it would only be fair to give our assesment of the 19 weeks of produce. Although we have been at this for over 6 years on our own and between two different locations, We still are learning A LOT. Every season has it’s own unique challenges. Right when you think you have tomatoes figured out, the varieties to choose, how to trellis 6000 plants, the various insects and disease that want to kill them. There always seems to be something else that comes down the line that makes you go, OH, I’ve never had that happen before. So now we have to learn about that (i.e. record heat and rainfall)  On down the line…. We really try to stray away from the moaning and groaning about the weather, and just roll with the punches and over plant and keep  planting. which in it self in daunting and overwhelming.

But in summary, the Spring was great on many counts,we felt we really pulled out the stuff we wanted to feature in the boxes, like the spinach and head lettuce, and broccoli. But the as the summer progressed things did get more challenging weather wise and really made for a touch and go late summer/ fall. But all told we feel like we came close to what we had planned. Even though we had a whole list of crops fail or be comprimised because of the weather.

SO… here is what we are going to do about.

1 raised beds. a lot of the dying off we experienced in the fields was because of low spots. We are going to raise up the beds we plant into and this will help with many different aspects of vegetable growth. Less wash out potential, and more even all around yields (hopefully)

2 greenhouses for a more sure summer crops and earlier/later spring and fall crops

3 take into account the suggestions and adjust planting accordingly. i.e.. many of you don’t want so much cabbage, so we are kicking around a take it or leave it option at your dropsites. So when we do have these ‘on the fence crops’ where half want it and half don’t you can take it from the dropsite box or leave for someone else. We always are aware the more options and flexability are a plus, so we accomodate as much as we can with moving delivery dates around and what not.

4 we will have pork available from our farm next spring in a ‘pork sampler’ package of 15-20 lbs for just 5$ lb. bacon, chops, hams, roasts, ribs, what’s not to like. and an egg share option

On the farm……

as I write this we are having the greatest farm experience ever. A home birth of our first baby boy.

thanks for all your support… Hope to see you next season.


2010 crew; jenna, kate, rama, josh, abbie, nick


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Week 18, October 7, 2010

What’s in the box?


onions

garlic

carrots

radishes

salad mix

swiss chard

broccoli side shoots

butternut squash

parsley

Recipes:

Parsley Cream Soup

Melt 1/2 stick butter in a sauce pan.  Add 2 sliced onions and 2 celery ribs, cut into thin slices and saute over a low heat until vegetables are tender.  Add 4 diced potatoes and 4 cups chicken stock.  Simmer until potatoes are soft.  Add a bunch of chopped parsley and simmer a few more minutes.  Take the soup off the heat and let it cool slightly.  If you want a creamy soup, puree everything in a blender and season with salt and pepper. Mix in 2 cups of cream before serving.

Garlic Soba Noodles from 101 cookbooks (a new way to use radishes and eat some greens!) (she uses tofu for the protein, but chicken or porkchops would be equally as good)

At the Farm…..

This box was a little rough for us during packing.  Thinking back to last season when we were loading people down with squash, potatoes, carrots, brussel sprouts, etc….  What a difference a little (okay, a lot) of rain makes!  Nothing feels better to us than loading the boxes with vast amounts of great veggies.  Sometimes things don’t work out as we had planned…  The good news is that we are moving to a raised bed system for next season.  This will help our heavy soil drain in wet years like this one.  So we will have irrigation for dry years and raised beds for rainy years.  We are working on having all our bases covered.  Next week we should have more of the same in the box as well as some spinach and possibly brussel sprouts.  Keep your fingers crossed!

We had a really nice time at the harvest party and want to thank everyone that came out.  Did you forget your pan or baking dish?  Send us an email and we will bring it to your drop site next week.  This week we finally got a killing frost.  No more peppers or basil to be had.  But then it promptly warmed back up and we’ve been enjoying the colors changing and the perfect weather.  It will be really nice for planting garlic for next season.

Enjoy these pictures of our week old piglets…

Thanks so much to everyone who has filled out a survey!  If you haven’t done so, please do!  Here’s the link. We are learning a lot from the feed back.  It will help us fine tune things for next season. One thing’s for sure we won’t put in so much cabbage….  Even the pigs are tired of it 😉

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